Hamer Centaura

Hamer Centaura

Year: 1990

Made In: USA

Specs: Alder body, one-piece maple neck, rosewood fretboard

Electronics: Seymour Duncan SH4 Humbucker & SSL1 single coil, DiMarzio Fast Track humbucking pickup

Controls: Volume, Tone, 5-way pickup selctor switch, “thick” switch

I definitely have a thing for superstrats. Presented with the opportunity of picking up this Centaura from the golden age of superstrats, I sacrificed a nice USA Fender Strat without blinking an eye. A reversed headstock, Floyd bridge and stock JB humbucker tick all the right boxes for me.

Hamer are somewhat of an overlooked brand both now and when the company actually existed. My first experience of one was when the guitarist in my band in the early 90’s had a really nice Chaparral he picked up second hand. They weren’t the kind of guitar you’d see in the shops over here. I have always kept an eye out since for a good deal on one.

This guitar needed a bit of work, for sure. The guy selling it was a little liberal with the details but there was nothing I couldn’t sort out quickly.  I levelled and dressed the frets and replaced the two bridge posts, bringing this guitar back to the standard it should be at. What a standard it is, too. It’s a large radius fretboard mated to a slim but rounded neck which is very, very comfortable. It feels quite traditional but is deceptively thin. It’s only when you play a more standard neck that you realise how thin it actually is. Initially, the return to pitch wasn’t good but, after replacing the two worn bridge posts, the German Schaller made Floyd Rose bridge is solid as a rock.

You can’t go wrong with a JB, so there are no worries on the tone front. The guitar would have had a pair of SSL1 single coils as stock but the neck pickup was replaced with a DiMarzio Fast Track at some point. This is a fine pickup in its own right, so no concerns there either. There are no clever wiring tricks with the pickup switch, both humbuckers remain in serial mode when individually selected and when combined with the middle single coil. Each position has a unique sound to it and all a very usable.

This guitar also features a “thick” switch, a little mini-toggle which engages a treble bleed circuit which is a nice feature, meaning you can get a fatter tone without changing pickup.

The slightly smaller body is light and comfortable with the output jack on the rear end and strap button moved slightly up from centre to accommodate. The blue colour of paint changes depending on the amount of natural light. It brightens up, much like in the pictures, in daylight and turns almost navy blue under artificial light. There’s a metallic gold layer of paint under the top blue coat and, somehow, they both interact in this unusual way.

All in all this is a very nicely put together guitar, compact in size but rich in quality and versatility. It is a great neck shape, rivalling the feel and comfort of Charvel but with a much more accessible truss rod. I think we’ll be spending a lot of time together in the future.

Advertisements

Gibson Flying V

Gibson Flying V

Year: 1990

Made In: USA

Specs: Mahogany body, mahogany neck, rosewood fretboard

Electronics: Seymour Duncan JB & 59 pickups

Controls: Volume x 2, tone & 3-way switch

Lured by the presence of the Kahler vibrato, I brought this one in from the US. This was actually my first V. It needed some work, it was in pretty poor shape when it arrived. I ended up replacing the stock pickups and mutilated wiring and, after a fret level and dress, this was a pretty good player and sounded rather nice indeed. It was a lot better guitar than the next Gibson V I would have years later. Despite this, the band I was in at the time I was tuning lower and lower and I needed something longer than the 24.75″ scale so I eased it on out the door to release some funds.